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Laws of UX - Part 2

Xion Studio
Xion Studio UI UX

This is the part-II of Laws of UX, a collection of the maxims and principles for a fast and accessible user interfaces created by Jon Yablonski.

 

Miller's Law

Miller's Law

The average person can only keep 7 (plus or minus 2) items in their working memory.

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Occam's Razor

Occam's Razor

Among competing hypotheses that predict equally well, the one with the fewest assumptions should be selected.

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Pareto Principle

Pareto Principle

The Pareto principle states that, for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

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Parkinson's Law

Parkinson's Law

Any task will inflate until all of the available time is spent.

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Peak-End Rule

Peak-End Rule

People judge an experience largely based on how they felt at its peak and at its end, rather than the total sum or average of every moment of the experience.

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Postel's Law

Postel's Law

Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send.

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Serial Position Effect

Serial Position Effect

Users have a propensity to best remember the first and last items in a series.

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Von Restorff Effect

Von Restorff Effect

The Von Restorff effect, also known as The Isolation Effect, predicts that when multiple similar objects are present, the one that differs from the rest is most likely to be remembered.

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Zeigarnik Effect

Zeigarnik Effect

People remember uncompleted or interrupted tasks better than completed tasks.

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Law of UX was created by Jon Yablonski which seeks to make complex psychology heuristics accessible to more designers through an interactive resource that collects those that are relevant to user experience design and presents them in a visually engaging way. You can reach out to him via this contact form.

All the images are copyright of John Yablonski. You can find more info about this content here.

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